An “e” For Thee

During a Spring Break trip to Philadelphia, we made all the required stops:  Independence Hall, Liberty Bell, Betsy Ross’s house. We even made a side excursion to the Philadelphia residence of Edgar Allan Poe because my daughter was reading “The Tell-Tale Heart.” Creepy!

My favorite stop was Franklin Court on Chestnut Street, the site of Franklin’s home and printing office. It was there that I picked up a few fun quotes and a new edition of Poor Richard’s Almanack.

In the Almanack, you can see printing press smudges and interesting fonts that were used in the 1700s. Back then they also liked to end certain words with “e”, which I suppose was a holdover from how words were spelled in London. This convention was eventually dropped, like the “u” in words ending in “-our”. 

But today, there’s a tabloid-style newspaper in upstate New York trying to bring back an element of those days by spelling hometown with an extra “e”.

They’d like us to believe it’s “alright” to do this, but it’s not. (We think they meant “It’s All Right Here.”)

Your Hometowne? Poor Richard’s Almanack you’re not.

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3 Comments

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3 responses to “An “e” For Thee

  1. Kathryn

    Nice to see someone who can use “thee” correctly! I find myself all too often gritting my teeth over people who think that the second person singular tense of verbs was the general verbal format for all persons at some time in the past. OK, agreed, you didn’t break into verb forms–but you used the correct form of the pronoun “thou,” in a context when many would have been clueless.

    Brava!!

  2. Kathryn

    btw–NICE hook!

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